Cover Image
close this bookAid to Agriculture: Reversing the Decline - Food Policy Report (IFPRI, 1993, 24 p.)
View the document(introduction...)
View the documentPreface
View the documentPayoffs to Investment in Agriculture
View the documentRole of Aid in Agricultural Investment
View the documentChanging Patterns of External Assistance to Agriculture
View the documentTrends and Outlooks for Major Donors
View the documentDeveloping-Country Responses
View the documentReasons for the Decline
View the documentProspects for the Future
View the documentConclusions

(introduction...)

JOACHIM VON BRAUN
RAYMOND F. HOPKINS
DETLEV PUETZ
RAJUL PANDYA-LORCH

THE INTERNATIONAL FOOD POLICY RESEARCH INSTITUTE

Washington, D.C.
October 1993

INTERNATIONAL FOOD POLICY RESEARCH INSTITUTE

The International Food Policy Research Institute was established in 1975 to identify and analyze alternative national and international strategies and policies for meeting food needs in the world, with particular emphasis on low-income countries and on the poorer groups in those countries. While the research effort is geared to the precise objective of contributing to the reduction of hunger and malnutrition, the factors involved are many and wide-ranging, requiring analysis of underlying processes and extending beyond a narrowly defined food sector. The Institute's research program reflects world-wide interaction with policymakers, administrators, and others concerned with increasing food production and with improving the equity of its distribution. Research results are published and distributed to officials and others concerned with national and international food and agricultural policy.

The Institute receives support as a constituent of the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research from a number of donors including Australia, Belgium, Canada, the People's Republic of China, the Ford Foundation, France, the Federal Republic of Germany, India, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, the Philippines, the Rockefeller Foundation, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, the United States, and the World Bank. In addition, a number of other governments and institutions contribute funding to special research projects.