Council of Independent Colleges Historic Campus Architecture Project

 

 
Mary J. Regier Building

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Institution Name: Tabor College
Original/Historic Place Name: intermittently known as Music Building
Location on Campus: north central part of campus, northwest of Lohrenz Building
Date(s) of Construction:
1919-1920original construction Mampe, William
Designer: William Mampe
Type of Place: Individual building
Style: Beaux-Arts classicism (Glossary)
Significance: history
Narrative: see below
References: see below
Materials:
Foundation: concrete
Walls: concrete, with brick facing (exterior)
Roof:
 
Function:
ca. 1920-1950residence hall (women)
ca. 1920-1950dining hall
ca. 1950-1980academic department building (music)
ca. 2004-present (2006)faculty offices
ca. 2004-present (2006)other (computer labs)
ca. 2004-present (2006)other (photographer's studio)
ca. 2004-present (2006)academic department building (graphic arts)
 

Narrative:
At the time of its inception, Tabor College consisted of only one building. Following the fire of April 1918, two buildings were erected: a large building to house administrative offices, classrooms and a chapel, and a second smaller building to serve as a girls' dormitory and dining hall. The construction of the second building was made possible by the generosity of a single woman from Henderson, Nebraska, Mary J. Regier, who donated her inheritance in the amount of $15,000, for this express purpose. Construction began in March of 1919 and was completed in March of 1920, at which time the front entrance steps were completed and the dining room occupied.

William Mampe, from Kansas City, Missouri, was engaged to design and construct both the H.W. Lohrenz Building and the Mary J. Regier Building. This second smaller building was designed to match the larger more elegant Lohrenz Building, but with simpler motifs and decoration. Instead of large free-standing columns at the front entrance, the effect of columns was designed in the brickwork, utilizing the same contrast with red brick and terra cotta.

During the 1950's through the 1980's the building was known as the Music Hall. In the early 1990's the name was returned to the Mary J. Regier Building, to honor the memory of the donor for the building. It is affectionately called "the MJR."
 

References:

Tabor College Blue Jay (1916-1920): 18-19.

 

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