Council of Independent Colleges Historic Campus Architecture Project

 

 
Inspector's House

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Institution Name: Salem College
Original/Historic Place Name: Inspector's House
Location on Campus: Academy St. on Salem Square
Date(s) of Construction:
1811original construction
Designer: unknown
Type of Place: Individual building
Style: Regionalist/Vernacular, Other (Glossary)
Significance: architecture, culture, education, history, religion
Narrative: see below
References: see below
Materials:
Foundation: stuccoed stone
Walls: brick
Roof: clay tile
 
Function:
ca. 1811private residence (and office of the Inspector of the Girls' Boarding School)
ca. 2004-present (2006)other (bookstore)
ca. 2004-present (2006)administration (Office of the President of Salem Academy and College)
 

Narrative:
Salem Academy & College was established in 1772 by the Moravian Single Sisters in the village of Salem. The success of the Sisters' school for girls soon required an expansion of facilities, and in 1809 planning was begun for additional space to accommodate the residential and office needs of the "Inspector" of the school, thereby giving the building its name. The Inspector's House was occupied in 1811 when Br. Steiner moved with his family into the new house. Eight Boarding School children also resided in the house since there was no more room in the school dormitory.

The Inspector's House sits on the northeast corner of Salem Square, directly across from Main Hall and Home Moravian Church and adjacent to the Boys' School. Like many of its neighbors, the main block of the Inspector's House is laid in Flemish bond brick with glazed headers. It is a story and one-half on a stuccoed stone raised basement, with five bays, a centered door with its original arched Moravian hood, and many other features typical of the period. Additions to the building (1838 and ca. 1850) doubled its size.

The Inspector's House has served as the office of the head of the school (known at times as the Inspector, Principal, Headmaster, and President) since its construction, and the reception room remains the same as well. The additions have been used in various ways over the years and currently house the Salem Academy & College bookstore.
 

References:

Albright, Frank, and Frank Horton. "History of Properties in Old Salem." Manuscript. Siewers Archive Room, Dale H. Gramley Library, Salem College, Winston-Salem, NC, 1970.

Gramley, Dale H. Remembrances of Salem's 13th President: Dale H. Gramley (1949-1971). Winston-Salem, NC: Salem Academy and College, 1985.

Hartley, Michael O., and Martha B. Boxley. Salem Survey 1997. Winston-Salem, NC: Old Salem, Inc., 1997.

Hartley, Michael O., and Martha B. Boxley. Survey Files for Salem National Register Landmark District Proposal. Winston-Salem, NC: Old Salem, Inc., 1997.

Office Building [Salem College]. Historic American Buildings Survey report and photographs. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the Interior/ National Park Service, n.d.

Old Salem Historic District [including Salem College]. National Register of Historic Places designation report. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of the Interior/ National Park Service, 1966.

Rauschenberg, Bradford L. Salem College Study. Winston-Salem, NC: Wachovia Historical Society, 1983.

Rondthaler, Edward. Life with Letters, As They Turn Photogenic. New York: Hastings House, 1981.

 

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Last update: November 2006